Happy Slipknot day!

We Are Not Your Kind is finally with us, although many fans discovered a leaked version via YouTube a few days ago, the rest of the world can finally experience the ferocity of Slipknot’s 6th studio record - unless you count Mate. Feed. Kill. Repeat. - which many do not.

On the lead up to the release of the record, Corey Taylor had given many hints in regards to the sound of the new album, stating that it had hints of IOWA and Vol.3, however, they in no way intended to try to repeat any of their previous works.

Now, in a huge in depth interview with Loudwire, Corey goes All Out on the new material, his history with working on previous albums, toxic relationships that nearly destroyed him, and more!

All Hope is Gone is that it was a power struggle, basically. Without naming names, I was stuck in the middle
- Taylor

“Here’s the thing: When I got out of that relationship it was euphoria at first because it was hard. It was hard stepping away. I had done everything I could to make it work. Once I got to the point where I realized there was no way it was going to work I had to step away for my own self-preservation.”

Taylor mentions some similarities to Vol.3 in terms of the overall feel of WANYK - “I feel like this album follows that spirit even more than Vol. 3. I think Vol. 3 has some great songs on it and it has a wider field, while We Are Not Your Kind is just so fuckin’ dark that it’s compelling in a way that Vol. 3 never was.”

When asked about how the recording process of WANYK compared to previous records, Taylor said - “We were all very much of the mindset where we went, Okay, no one’s trying to force us into a certain mindset or a certain direction. Let’s get back to where we were. Let’s get back to that point where we can craft these amazing moments and knit them together with these heavy, heavy songs – these frenetic fucking bursts of energy. And let’s draw on all of these influences that we’ve had for so long and that we hinted at with Vol. 3 but that we’ve never been able to let really shine and let them off the chain.”

“This was actually a joy to put together. Even the difficult times when we were trying to figure out musical passages like mathematical equations, we were all just stoked to be making music and doing what we were built to do. It was really cool, and it was good to feel that way again.”

“The first song that made me feel like we were doing something different again was “Spiders.” That song wasn’t tracked in a typical way. The core of it was recorded and then we kept adding elements to it. We had all these songs around it that we were tracking and finishing, but we were constantly looking for the key to “Spiders.” We were looking for the moments to add to it. It was almost like seasoning a stew. Too much and it doesn’t work, just the right amount and it’s damn near perfect.”

Read the full interview here.

Author Bio: AC Speed

Senior Editor

I started my career as a music journalist in 2013 and have been involved in the music industry as a touring musician, studio engineer and artist consultant since 2002, as well as previously being a signed artist. My passion for delivering high quality, informative music-related news is a daily driving force behind the content I create. Also a huge gaming nerd! Born in the United Kingdom and currently living in Sweden. Skål!

CONTACT ME HERE

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